Roseland | Transportation

Tracking the Red Line Extension

At public hearing in Roseland, residents discuss the project’s impact

Katie Bart

On November 1, the St. John Missionary Baptist Church on 115th Street in Roseland became the forum for discussions that could shape the future of the area for years to come—with changes potentially rippling across the entire South Side. Community members, CTA officials, and organizers came together for the only public hearing on the environmental impact statement for the Red Line extension project, the details of which were announced in late September. “The draft environmental impact statement looks closely at the potential benefits and impacts of both the east and west options,” says Jeffery Tolman, a spokesperson for the CTA, referring to two possible routes for the extended Red Line.“The public meeting was to seek out the community’s feedback.” The final route and impact statement will be unveiled in 2017, Tolman says.

Health care | Roseland

For Wounds Long Unseen and Neglected

A new triage center in Roseland provides alternatives for individuals with mental illness

When individuals with mental illness live in underserved communities, without adequate mental health care, they often seek antidotes elsewhere: Many try to self-medicate with alcohol or illegal substances. Some resort to retail theft or other petty crimes to get by. For others, a mental health crisis may escalate to a point where they become a threat to themselves or others.

Best of the South Side 2015 | Pullman | Roseland

Best of Pullman & Roseland 2015

Luke White

From their arrival in 1849 until George M. Pullman began to build his utopian Town of Pullman in 1880, the Dutch settled the Lake Calumet Region. To this day, these early settlers have left their impression on the area, and vice versa: an exhibit on Roseland is currently on display at the Eenigenburg Museum in the Netherlands commemorating those early settlement years.

Pullman | Roseland

Slow Roll Rides Again

Lexi Drexelius

The weather man did not tell the truth,” remarked Oboi Reed, smiling defiantly despite the pouring rain. This was the sort of day that made me want to crawl back into bed, not the best biking weather. But there I was, setting out for a bike tour through the Roseland and Pullman neighborhoods. Continue reading

Englewood | Politics | Roseland

Uncertain Future for Breast Cancer Screenings

Shifting funding sources are concern for South Side women's health
HANNA PETROSKI

HANNA PETROSKI

This April, for the third year in a row, Illinois legislators voted to cut the budget of the Illinois Breast and Cervical Cancer Program (IBCCP)—a state-run initiative that aims to provide free preventative care and cancer treatments to uninsured Illinois women—by nearly $296,000. It was a major blow for an already-lean budget. Although Mayor Rahm Emanuel recently stepped in to provide money to replace IBCCP funds and provide screenings to 1,500 more Chicago women through Roseland Community Hospital, the long-term sustainability of the city’s breast cancer programs and the rationale for the initial cuts to IBCCP’s budget have both been called into question by local health advocates. Anne Marie Murphy, executive director of the Metropolitan Chicago Breast Cancer Task Force, described this year’s budget cuts as “draconian.”  Continue reading