Interviews | Politics

Meet the Challengers: Byron Sigcho Lopez

The Weekly sits down with a candidate for alderman in the 25th Ward

Katie Hill

For the past few years, Byron Sigcho Lopez has been a ubiquitous fixture around Pilsen. As the director of the Pilsen Alliance for the past three years, he’s helped organize a wide range of community meetings, protests, and referendums, with a special emphasis on housing justice. Sigcho Lopez has now taken a leave of absence from the group to run for alderman in the 25th Ward, which stretches from a northeastern corner of McKinley Park, across all of Pilsen, north to parts of the West Loop and South Loop, and south to Chinatown.

Politics

Meet the Challengers: Hilario Dominguez

The Weekly sits down with a candidate for alderman in the 25th Ward

Kathrine Hill

At twenty-five, Pilsen native Hilario Dominguez is the youngest candidate in the crowded race for alderman in the 25th Ward, which covers Pilsen, Chinatown, and parts of Tri-Taylor, McKinley Park, the West Loop, and the South Loop. The incumbent, Danny Solis, has held the position since 1996 — three years after Dominguez was born.

Development | Features | History | Politics | Woodlawn

Where Are You Going, Woodlawn?

At a community celebration, residents and visitors consider the neighborhood’s next chapter

Ireashia Bennett, Ellen Hao

With the Obama Presidential Center proposed for Jackson Park, the University of Chicago’s continuing development along 61st Street, and a myriad of other projects large and small, residents are asking: what will Woodlawn become? This is the first article in a series investigating the past, present, and future of the neighborhood.

Elections

Election Explainer: Metropolitan Water Reclamation District

Whichever way the votes count up, there’s some change coming to the Metropolitan Water Reclamation District

Ellen Hao

It’s an unusual election year for the Metropolitan Water Reclamation District of Greater Chicago (MWRD). Normally, every two years, three of the nine seats on the district’s board of commissioners go up for election. Each seat has a six-year term. The idea is to stagger board turnover, so that from election year to election year, two-thirds of the board remains consistent.

Police | Politics

Cognitive Dissidence

Chicago’s abolitionists make space for conversation after the Van Dyke trial

Jedidiah Brown, middle, erupted in cheers with a crowd as they watch the broadcasted verdict for Jason Van Dyke outside Cook County. Jason Van Dyke, a white Chicago Police Officer, was convicted of Second Degree Murder and 16 counts of aggravated battery with a firearm for each of shots in the shooting death of 17-year-old Laquan McDonald. Soon after the conviction, Chicago activist took to the streets in protest for police reform, chanting, "CPD! Guilty of conspiracy." (Sebastián Hidalgo)

The evening after the Van Dyke verdict came down, Trina Reynolds-Tyler took to Instagram to ask her followers a simple question: “What is justice for Laquan McDonald?” An organizer and abolitionist, Reynolds-Tyler has been involved with activism around the McDonald shooting since before it caught the public’s attention.

Activism | Immigration | Police | Politics

Know Your Movements: The #EraseTheDatabase Campaign

The organizers working to reform and abolish the city’s gang database

Kahari Black

In the coming months before the February municipal elections, the Weekly will be profiling not only the candidates for public office, but also the grassroots movements that shape the political landscape in Chicago communities. Over the next few months, we will be asking mayoral and aldermanic candidates about their positions on each of these movements.

Interviews | Politics

Meet the Challengers: David Mihalyfy

The Weekly sits down with a candidate for alderman in the 11th Ward

Courtesy David Mihalyfy

I met with David Mihalyfy on a warm summer night in Bridgeport. We were originally supposed to conduct our interview at First Base, a now-closed sports bar, but realized soon after arriving it would be too loud to conduct an interview there. We relocated to some chairs outside Scoops Ice Cream on 31st Street and continued over a strawberry Italian ice (for me) and a chocolate-covered frozen banana (for him).

Interview Issue 2018 | Politics

Continuing to Challenge the Status Quo

A family legacy of activism guides mayoral candidate Amara Enyia’s vision of social justice in the city

Senhyo

Between her first mayoral run in 2014 and now, Dr. Amara Enyia hasn’t slowed down in her efforts to effect change in Chicago. She co-authored the book Chicago Is Not Broke and founded the Institute for Cooperative Economics and Economic Innovation, a social lab focusing on educating and assisting in the expansion of innovative economic models. On Tuesday, Enyia will launch her second mayoral bid at the Co-Prosperity Sphere in Bridgeport. The thirty-five-year-old, running with the slogan “all people, all voices, one city,” draws on a legacy of activism stretching back to her great-grandmother’s village in Nigeria.