Comics Issue 2018

The Comics Issue 2018

Amber Huff

In our fourth annual Comics Issue, we reaffirm our belief in the extraordinary power of visual storytelling. It is a form that requires particular skill not only in creation, but in cultivation—the editing process for this issue, led by our team of visuals editors, deserves special praise.

Guides

Summer Festival Guide 2018

Lilly Astrow

School’s out, the weather’s finally warmed up, and twilight stretches long, but by our count, there’s no time to put your feet up this summer. In our biggest summer guide yet, we’ve compiled almost forty festivals, fests, fiestas, fairs, parties, celebrations, concerts, and carnivals to fill your sunny South Side summer days.

Photo Essay | Visual Arts

Art for Everybody

Blackstone Bicycle Works’ second annual art show

J. Michael Eugenio

Last week, the Experimental Station in Woodlawn hosted the opening of the second annual “Bike Shop Art Show,” featuring work created by participants and volunteers of Blackstone Bicycle Works—which, like the Weekly, is housed within the Experimental Station—and organized by Experimental Station assistant director Matthew Searle. Blackstone’s youth arts program is coordinated by Experimental Station lead teaching artist Tita Thomas in partnership with the University of Chicago’s South Side in Focus program.

Food Issue 2018

The Food Issue 2018

Renee Rolewicz

Welcome to the Weekly’s third annual Food Issue, our brightest and spiciest yet. Over the next twenty-four pages, you’ll encounter a veritable feast prepared by the Weekly’s intrepid and insatiable reporters. Like in years past, reviews and profiles—of a family’s habanero hot sauce line, pizza in Bronzeville, michelada and smoothies, new coffee shops and a newly closed coffee shop, and bars along Archer Avenue—abound. But for the whole story of the meal on your plate, look out for pieces that report on the broader context of food production, like the new wave of agricultural cooperatives cropping up across the South Side, the anti-slaughter organizing that activists have brought down to the old Stockyards, and the 2011 urban agriculture zoning amendment that legalized for-profit urban farms—and at the same time raised the barriers to starting, and finding an appropriate business license for, an urban farm in the city of Chicago. To top it off, a new contributor makes a compelling argument about how our conversation about a just food system fails to hit the mark—and that we should be talking about racism, segregation, and the minimum wage when we talk about food access on the South Side. As always, we wish we could feature even more of the nuanced flavors of the South and West Sides than we can fit in one issue. But we’re confident that what awaits you is a carefully crafted and satisfying nine-course meal—so tuck in!