Calendar

Notes & Calendar 6/6/18

Notes

R.I.P., ZackTV

One of the hardest skills to come by is the ability to navigate between different communities. Most people become confined to one group or the other, whether because they can only find similarities with one, proximity, or just by chance. Vlogger ZackTV, also known as Zack Stoner, devoted his life to making Chicago’s fractious rap scene into one community, as Leor Galil wrote in a memorial this week in the Reader. The resident of south suburban Harvey was killed in the South Loop leaving a concert last week.

He was a dedicated documentarian and music journalist who conducted interviews and music videos for artists around the city, including Chief Keef, Rondo Numba 9, King Yella, and HaHa Davis. People were attracted to ZackTV because he interviewed artists in their element; he recognized that these artists and the people around them had important stories to tell, and instead of waiting for someone else to tell them, he made the effort to capture them himself. His work will never be forgotten.

Stop Frisking

On Monday, Lucy Parsons Labs (LPL), a nonprofit focused on data-driven civic accountability, released six years of data on police stops conducted by the Chicago Police Department. LPL was able to obtain the data after months of stalling and active resistance from the city, including a private agreement with the ACLU of Illinois that helped keep the data hidden from public view. The data is publicly available for further analysis; an early visualization shows a clear disparity in police stops between neighborhoods. Two beats in West Garfield Park and Humboldt Park on the West Side registered nearly 33,000 stops combined—in comparison, most other beats had a few hundred to a couple thousand. On the South Side, areas including Chicago Lawn, Englewood, and Woodlawn also saw a higher-than-average number of stops. At a glance, the data confirms long-held assertions that communities of color on the South and West Sides are subject to more frequent stop-and-frisks, and opens up the floor for more data-driven critiques of the CPD. As the Weekly reported in 2015, Chicago’s stop-and-frisk program dwarfed New York City’s far more controversial one at its absolute height.

Calendar

BULLETIN

Preserving Pilsen: Future of Green Space and Affordable Housing

National Museum of Mexican Art, 1852 W. 19th St. Wednesday, June 6. 6pm–8pm. Free. bit.ly/PreservingPilsen

Discuss pressing issues in the Pilsen neighborhood—including the impending El Paseo trail, the former Fisk coal plant, and the 18th & Peoria lot—as part of a Pilsen Alliance–hosted community discussion with the goal of creating a community-driven plan for green space and affordable housing in the community. (Sam Stecklow)

Chicago Interfaith Conference on Drone Warfare

Chicago Theological Seminary, 1407 E. 60th St. Thursday, June 7, 10am–4pm. Free with registration, but donations accepted. bit.ly/InterfaithDroneWarfare

Featuring presentations from retired Col. Lawrence Wilkerson, Dr. Susan Thistlethwaite, and others, this daylong conference will delve into, presumably, the spiritual effects of drone warfare, featuring two film screenings. A “light” lunch will be provided. (Sam Stecklow)

Public Newsroom: Andrea Ritchie Presents #InvisibleNoMore

Build Coffee, 6100 S. Blackstone Ave. Thursday, June 7, 6pm–8pm. Free. bit.ly/PNAndreaRitchie

Author, advocate, and attorney Andrea Ritchie will discuss her new book about police violence against women of color, Invisible No More, with the Invisible Institute and BYP100’s Trina Reynolds-Tyler, a dear friend of the Weekly. The event will feature a presentation from Ritchie and Reynolds-Tyler on how reporters and organizers often overlook women and LGBTQ people of color in coverage of police violence. (Sam Stecklow)

Spatial Concentration and the Infrastructures of Race

Blood Fruit Library, 3084 S. Lock St. Friday, June 8, 6:30pm–9:30pm. Free. bit.ly/SpatialConcentration

University of Michigan Spanish professor Daniel Nemser discusses his research on the history of concentration camps—a technique of social control dating back to the earliest expansion of Europeans into the Americas. Snacks provided. (Sam Stecklow)

Community Call to Action

BBF Family Services, 1512 S. Pulaski Rd. Saturday, June 9, 1pm–3pm. Free with registration. (312) 422-5580. envisioningjustice.org

Part of Illinois Humanities’ Envisioning Justice programming, this community discussion on police reform features new CPD hire Maurice Classen, now Superintendent Eddie Johnson’s director of strategy; Kenny Smith, a Lawndale resident and activist; and Maira Khwaja, the Invisible Institute’s engagement director and an alum of the Weekly. Speakers will share thoughts on police reform, followed by small breakout brainstorming groups. (Sam Stecklow)

FOOD & LAND

Parks as Contested Spaces

Arts + Public Life, 301 E. Garfield Blvd. Wednesday, June 6, 6:30pm–8pm. Free. (773) 702-9724. RSVP on bit.ly/parksascontestedspaces

Alongside the “Everyday Resistance: The Art of Living in Black Chicago” exhibit, Arts + Public Life is hosting a conversation with Meida Teresa McNeal, arts and culture manager with the Chicago Park District, and Gia Biagi, principal of urbanism and civil impact at Studio Gang, to discuss the roles public parks play in their communities and how “use, access, safety, and leisure” shift along racial lines. (Rachel Kim)

Our Journey North

35th Street Pedestrian Bridge (East Side), 636 E. 35th St. Saturday, June 9, 9am–2pm. Breakfast, lunch, garden gloves, and tools provided. Bring bottled water and wear closed-toe shoes. Register at bit.ly/OurJourneyNorth. (312) 869-9546. info@sacredkeepers.org

Monarch butterflies, who represent migration, liberation, and beauty, will symbolize the Sacred Keepers Sustainability Lab’s “day rooted in stewardship and cultural celebration.” The Lab is recruiting volunteers to help build a butterfly habitat near the lake that will serve as a communal space for building stronger Black and Latinx communities. (Rachel Kim)

Food and Fitness on the Farm: Goat Yoga and Mini Harvest Demo

South Chicago Farm, 9000 S. Green Bay Ave. Saturday, June 9, 10am—4pm. $10–$25. Scholarships and work exchanges available; contact info@urbangrowerscollective.org. (773) 376-8882. facebook.com/urbangrowerscollective

Urban Growers Collective is putting a twist on their regular farm volunteer day this Saturday: they’re pulling out the yoga mats and their dwarf and pygmy goats for an hour of relaxation (10am–11am). Following yoga, there will be a demo class on harvesting and storing produce (11:30am–12:30pm). Come by for either event, or for volunteer orientation at 10am or 1pm. (Emeline Posner)

SOUL Celebration at Currency Exchange and Bing Art Books

Currency Exchange Cafe, 305 E. Garfield Blvd. Monday, June 11, 6pm–9pm. (773) 855-9163. facebook.com/SOULcookbook

Monday’s underappreciated: it’s as good a day as any other to celebrate, eat well, and dance. The occasion, in this case, is a book signing for Chicago-born, Atlanta-based chef Todd Richards’s recently released book, Soul: A Chef’s Culinary Evolution in 150 Recipes. Come hungry, and ready to dance—there will be food and drink prepared by Currency Exchange chef Lamar Moore, and a DJ set by Richards himself to follow. (Emeline Posner)

MUSIC

Tink

The Promontory, 5311 S. Lake Park Ave. Friday, June 8, doors 8pm, show 8:30pm–11pm. 18+. $27 in advance, $30 at door. (312) 801-2100. bit.ly/pain-and-pleasure

After a year and a half in record label development hell (thanks, Timbaland), Tink dropped the outstanding “Pain & Pleasure” EP back in March. Now, the Calumet City rapper-singer will bring her new repertoire (and Atlanta rapper Salma Slim) to the Promontory. (Christopher Good)

AMFM Presents The Jazz Series: PRIDE

Reunion Chicago, 2557 W. North Ave. Friday, June 8, 7pm–11pm. $5 in advance, $7 at door. info@amfm-mag.com. amfm.life

Looking for jazz with a modern flair? Look no further: AMFM has got your back. The group is hosting a jazz series in different venues around Chicago to showcase various musicians and visual artists. For this month, head to Reunion Chicago to enjoy performances from KC Ortiz, Bonita Appleblunt, OrB BoX and more, while browsing the work of an up-and-coming visual artist. (Roderick Sawyer)

Pop-up Recording Studio and Workshop

Arts + Public Life, 301 E. Garfield Blvd. Saturday, June 9, 12:30pm–3pm. Free. RSVP at popuprecording.eventbrite.com. (773) 702-9724. arts.uchicago.edu

Want to make professional recordings, but don’t have a huge mixing board or the cash to shell out on mastering? Network with other musicians and pick up some tips and tricks at this one-day pop-up seminar, hosted by local producers Justin D. Marnez, Aquil Charlton, and Zach Bain-Selbo. (Christopher Good)

Dezron Douglas Black Lion Quartet

Co-Prosperity Sphere, 3219 S. Morgan St. Sunday, June 10, doors at 8pm, show 9pm–midnight. $10 in advance, $15 at door. (773) 837-0145. bit.ly/blacklionquartet

Two acclaimed New York jazz musicians—bassist Dezron Douglas and harpist Brandee Younger—will join forces with Chicago saxophonist Rajiv Halim and drummer Clif Wallace for a set as the Black Lion Quartet. They’ll be supported by another jazz four-piece, Resavoir, in their first-ever performance. (Christopher Good)

Prime Time: F00TW3RK

Museum of Contemporary Art, 220 E. Chicago Ave. Saturday, June 30, 7pm–11pm. $20 in advance, $15 for members, $25 at door. 21+. (312) 280-2660. mcachicago.org

The MCA will kick things up to 160 BPM with a nightlong celebration of footwork, featuring Teklife mainstay DJ Spinn, NYC producer Suzi Analogue, The Era, and two artists previously featured in the Weekly: RP Boo and Jana Rush. Other attractions include food, cocktails, virtual reality “experiences,” and a “.GIF party,” whatever that means. (Christopher Good)

STAGE & SCREEN

Brooksday 2018

Bubbly Creek Assembly & In/habit: Cross-contamination

 

Rotating locations: The Learning Machine, 3145 S. Morgan St; Raw Space, alley east of Morgan at W. 33rd Pl. Friday, June 8–Sunday, June 10. Opening on Friday at 6pm. Free. bit.ly/bubblycreekassembly

 

As befits its oozy namesake, the Bubbly Creek Assembly will dribble into multiple locations and explore many, many concerns (cyborgs, the anthropocene, feminist, queer, and anti-racist politics, hybridity…). The medium of choice is performance art, but there should be plenty of surprises in store. (Christopher Good)

 

Bunny XLV Print Release w/ Friends

 

Wabee Sabee Studios, 629 W. Cermak Rd. Saturday, June 9, 7pm–2am. Free. wabeesabeestudios.com

 

As a follow-up to his burlesque series, “Vaudeville VIII,” Chicago artist Bunny XLV will release brand-new paintings and screenprints at this East Pilsen studio. Guest artists Sam Johnson Sdjarte, JunkYard, and Eric Von Haynes will join. Come out and enjoy the show with music and free beverages. (Roderick Sawyer)

 

They Become Ours

 

Zhou B Art Center, 1029 W 35th St. Friday, June 15, 7pm–10pm. Free. tboexhibition@gmail.com. zhoubartcenter.com

 

Visit 062 Gallery (located in Zhou B Art Center) for this new exhibition: an exploration of intergenerational relationships and personal histories, and how these narratives relate to the self. With artists like Tannaz Motevalli, Marie Ségolène, Julia Sharpe, and more, this show will be sure to start conversations (and will have some analyzing their own narratives). (Roderick Sawyer)

 

The Decolonial Open Mic: Gentrification Mixtape Edition Part 2

 

La Catrina Cafe, 1011 W. 18th St. Monday, June 18, 5:30pm–9pm. Pay what you can ($5 suggested donation). lacatrinacafeon18@gmail.com.

 

Come out to the Decolonial Open Mic, a space for the amplification of Black, brown, and indigenous voices, art, and narratives hosted by ChiResists. Recordings of performances will be collected for their “GENTRIFICATION MIXTAPE,” set to come out this summer. Themes will include indigeneity, gender equality, overcoming toxic masculinity, surviving under colonialism, and much more. (Roderick Sawyer)

The Arts Incubator, 301 E. Garfield Blvd., and Gwendolyn Brooks Park, 4542 S. Greenwood Ave. Thursday, June 7, 3pm–5pm and 6pm–8pm. bit.ly/Brooksday2018

Celebrate Gwendolyn Brooks, the South Side’s favorite hometown poet, at this now-annual festival of her work and life. This year’s festival will feature readings from luminaries including Brooks’ daughter Nora Brooks Blakely, legendary activist and educator Bill Ayers, and the Weekly’s own Nicole Bond, including many others. After the initial celebration, there will be a special unveiling of a new statue of Brooks at her namesake park in Bronzeville—all in all, a can’t-miss Brooksday. (Sam Stecklow)

Against All Odds: The Fight for a Black Middle Class Screening

ABJ Community Services, 1818 E. 71st St. Saturday, June 9, 10am–12:30pm. Free with RSVP. bit.ly/BlackMiddleClassABJ

After feedback and interest, the Southeast Side Block Club Alliance and Illinois Humanities will host a second screening of journalist Bob Herbert’s documentary about the history and future of the Black middle class, which will be followed by a discussion with Herbert. (Sam Stecklow)

Do Not Submit Open Mic: Englewood

Kusanya Cafe, 825 W. 69th St. Saturday, June 9, 3pm–5pm. Free. bit.ly/DoNotSubmitEnglewood

Share your stories with Englewood residents at this open mic event, where anyone brave enough to take the stage has seven minutes to impart wisdom, humor, knowledge, or just an anecdote with the audience. (Sam Stecklow)

Recovering Soundscape at Big Marsh

Big Marsh Park, 11555 S. Stony Island Ave. Saturday, June 9, 4pm–6pm. Free. chicagoparkdistrict.com

Sound artist Norman Long and choreographer Sara Zalek will lead an exploration of the “recovering ecology” of Big Marsh bike park on the Far Southeast Side, a former slag field that has been repurposed for public use. (Sam Stecklow)

The Hoodoisie: Re/Membering Pulse Memorial Show

Club Kaliente, 2300 S. Blue Island Ave. Saturday, June 9, 6pm–10pm. Free. bit.ly/HoodoisiePulse

Closing out United Latinx Pride Week in Chicago is this installation of live news show The Hoodoisie, which will focus on queer nightlife as cultural resistance in memoriam of the Pulse Nightclub shootings and attacks on LGBTQ people since. (Sam Stecklow)

Black Lesbian Archives Exhibit

Affinity Community Services, 2850 S. Wabash Ave. Opens Thursday, June 14, 6pm–8pm, through Friday, July 13. Free with RSVP. bit.ly/BlackLesbianArchives

This monthlong exhibit, with a mission of discussing the importance of archiving the histories of marginalized communities, features discussions, screenings, open mics, and more. The opening, on June 14, doubles as a book release and artist talk with local director and screenwriter Yvonne Welbon. (Sam Stecklow)

VISUAL ARTS

Bubbly Creek Assembly & In/habit: Cross-contamination

Rotating locations: The Learning Machine, 3145 S. Morgan St; Raw Space, alley east of Morgan at W. 33rd Pl. Friday, June 8–Sunday, June 10. Opening on Friday at 6pm. Free. bit.ly/bubblycreekassembly

As befits its oozy namesake, the Bubbly Creek Assembly will dribble into multiple locations and explore many, many concerns (cyborgs, the anthropocene, feminist, queer, and anti-racist politics, hybridity…). The medium of choice is performance art, but there should be plenty of surprises in store. (Christopher Good)

Bunny XLV Print Release w/ Friends

Wabee Sabee Studios, 629 W. Cermak Rd. Saturday, June 9, 7pm–2am. Free. wabeesabeestudios.com

As a follow-up to his burlesque series, “Vaudeville VIII,” Chicago artist Bunny XLV will release brand-new paintings and screenprints at this East Pilsen studio. Guest artists Sam Johnson Sdjarte, JunkYard, and Eric Von Haynes will join. Come out and enjoy the show with music and free beverages. (Roderick Sawyer)

They Become Ours

Zhou B Art Center, 1029 W 35th St. Friday, June 15, 7pm–10pm. Free. tboexhibition@gmail.com. zhoubartcenter.com

Visit 062 Gallery (located in Zhou B Art Center) for this new exhibition: an exploration of intergenerational relationships and personal histories, and how these narratives relate to the self. With artists like Tannaz Motevalli, Marie Ségolène, Julia Sharpe, and more, this show will be sure to start conversations (and will have some analyzing their own narratives). (Roderick Sawyer)

The Decolonial Open Mic: Gentrification Mixtape Edition Part 2

La Catrina Cafe, 1011 W. 18th St. Monday, June 18, 5:30pm–9pm. Pay what you can ($5 suggested donation). lacatrinacafeon18@gmail.com.

Come out to the Decolonial Open Mic, a space for the amplification of Black, brown, and indigenous voices, art, and narratives hosted by ChiResists. Recordings of performances will be collected for their “GENTRIFICATION MIXTAPE,” set to come out this summer. Themes will include indigeneity, gender equality, overcoming toxic masculinity, surviving under colonialism, and much more. (Roderick Sawyer)

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