Public Meetings Report. Illustration by Holley Appold/South Side Weekly
Public Meetings Report. Illustration by Holley Appold/South Side Weekly
  1. Public Meetings Report – March 18, 2021
  2. Public Meetings Report – April 1, 2021
  3. Public Meetings Report – April 15, 2021
  4. Public Meetings Report – April 29, 2021
  5. Public Meetings Report – May 13, 2021
  6. Public Meetings Report – May 27, 2021
  7. Public Meetings Report – June 10, 2021
  8. Public Meetings Report – June 24, 2021
  9. Public Meetings Report – July 08, 2021
  10. Public Meetings Report – July 22, 2021
  11. Public Meetings Report – August 05, 2021
  12. Public Meetings Report – August 19, 2021
  13. Public Meetings Report – September 30, 2021
  14. Public Meetings Report – October 14, 2021
  15. Public Meetings Report – October 28, 2021
  16. Public Meetings Report – November 11, 2021
  17. Public Meetings Report – November 25, 2021
  18. Public Meetings Report – December 9, 2021
  19. Public Meetings Report – January 13, 2022
  20. Public Meetings Report – January 27, 2022
  21. Public Meetings Report – February 10, 2022
  22. Public Meetings Report – February 24, 2022
  23. Public Meetings Report – March 10, 2022
  24. Public Meetings Report – March 24, 2022
  25. Public Meetings Report – April 7, 2022
  26. Public Meetings Report – April 21, 2022
  27. Public Meetings Report – May 5, 2022
  28. Public Meetings Report – May 19, 2022
  29. Public Meetings Report – June 2, 2022
  30. Public Meetings Report – June 22, 2022
  31. Public Meetings Report – June 30, 2022
  32. Public Meetings Report – July 14, 2022
  33. Public Meetings Report – July 28, 2022
  34. Public Meetings Report – August 11, 2022
  35. Public Meetings Report – August 25, 2022
  36. Public Meetings Report — October 20, 2022
  37. Public Meetings Report — November 17, 2022
  38. Public Meetings Report — December 1, 2022
  39. Public Meetings Report — January 12, 2023
  40. Public Meetings Report — January 26, 2023
  41. Public Meetings Report — February 9, 2023
  42. Public Meetings Report — February 23, 2023
  43. Public Meetings Report — March 9, 2023
  44. Public Meetings Report — March 23, 2023
  45. Public Meetings Report — April 20, 2023
  46. Public Meetings Report — May 4, 2023
  47. Public Meetings Report — May 18, 2023
  48. Public Meetings Report — June 1, 2023
  49. Public Meetings Report — June 15, 2023
  50. Public Meetings Report — June 29, 2023
  51. Public Meetings Report — July 13, 2023
  52. Public Meetings Report — July 27, 2023
  53. Public Meetings Report — August 10, 2023
  54. Public Meetings Report — August 24, 2023
  55. Public Meetings Report — September 7, 2023
  56. Public Meetings Report — September 21, 2023
  57. Public Meetings Report — December 7, 2023
  58. Public Meetings Report — February 1, 2024
  59. Public Meetings Report — February 15, 2024
  60. Public Meetings Report — April 11, 2024
  61. Public Meetings Report — May 9, 2024
  62. Public Meetings Report — May 23, 2024
  63. Public Meetings Report — July 18, 2024

January 23

Solar power is coming to the Little Village and West Lawn branches of the Chicago Public Library. At its meeting, the Chicago City Council Committee on Budget and Government Operations authorized $2.3 million for a pilot project, to which the U.S. Department of Energy has contributed $1 million dollars. David Powell, a project manager for the city’s Bureau of Asset Management, said he expects the project to be completed by the end of the year if they receive authorization as planned.

January 24

A crowd at a Chicago City Council meeting clamored for “yes” votes on a Gaza cease-fire resolution that was directed at President Joe Biden, and for “no” votes on another resolution supporting arbitration for alleged serious police conduct violations. Public speakers had their say on both issues. A vote on a resolution supporting a cease-fire in Gaza was postponed when an alderperson said it would be disrespectful to consider the cease-fire resolution at the same meeting that Holocaust Remembrance Day was being recognized. The cease-fire resolution passed the following week, with Mayor Brandon Johnson casting a tie-breaking vote. A third resolution congratulating the Lane Tech girls flag football team’s state championship win was passed. New rules that ban metal water bottles and backpacks at Council meetings were in effect and enforced for both the public and the press.

January 30

At its meeting, the City Council Committee on Immigrant and Refugee Rights heard reports on the status of migrants in Chicago. About 7,000 of more than 14,000 migrants housed in City-run shelters are eligible to receive rental assistance from the state. The City has helped shelter residents apply for work permits. On an average day, residents file five grievance reports of poor treatment or living conditions, and staff file seventy-four incident reports of residents violating curfew or other conduct requirements, according to Maura McCauley of the Department of Family and Support Services. Other statistics provided by Beatriz Ponce De Leon showed the scope of immigrant arrivals since August 2022. Appointed last July, Ponce De Leon is the first deputy mayor of the Office of Immigrant, Migrant, and Refugee Rights. The day before the Council meeting, Mayor Brandon Johnson extended a sixty-day limit on shelter stays by thirty days.

January 30

During a Community Commission for Public Safety and Accountability West Side hearing with CPD Supt. Larry Snelling, some West Side residents said their neighborhoods haven’t experienced the citywide decline in crime. In 2023, shootings and homicides dropped by 13 percent in Chicago, returning to pre-pandemic rates. Increasing, however, were the number of robberies (by 23 percent) and car thefts (by 37 percent). Some residents shared personal experiences and wanted answers from CPD and the city. One said their brother was killed in October and that Snelling didn’t respond to several requests for information, including letters hand-delivered to his office. Disappearances and murders of Black women and girls continue to be a serious community concern. Snelling defended Chicago’s use of the ShotSpotter gunshot detection technology (Mayor Johnson announced the city would not renew ShotSpotter’s contract two weeks later).

January 31

At its meeting, the City Council passed a resolution to support a cease-fire in Gaza, becoming the largest city in the United States to do so. With the Council’s vote evenly split (23-23), Mayor Brandon Johnson cast the tie-breaking vote. (The Council had previously passed a resolution of solidarity with Israel and condemnation of Hamas.) The Council had been debating the resolution’s wording since it was introduced by Alderperson Rossana Rodríguez Sánchez (33rd Ward) in November. Before the vote, the language was updated to advocate for the release of Israeli hostages held by Hamas and cite additional statistics about the scale of the humanitarian crisis, though some Council members weren’t satisfied. Alderperson Samantha Nugent (39th Ward) presented a letter signed by twenty-three Council members, stating that the resolution “directly contradicts” the United States’ stance on foreign policy and undermines the authority of President Biden. 

✶ ✶ ✶ ✶

This information was collected and curated by the Weekly in large part using reporting from City Bureau’s Documenters at documenters.org.

Leave a comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *