Lit | Nature | Nature Issue 2017

A Complicated Wild

A collection of essays that highlight humans’ inextricable link to nature

Wildness: Relations of People & Place is a rare bird. It’s a collection bound not by genre or intended audience, but by a singular theme: that “human and wild communities are entangled, and can work toward collective health and self-renewal.” And so, across four parts and two-dozen essays, editors Gavin Van Horn and John Hausdoerffer recast mankind as a part of nature, one of many species, hitched to everything else in the universe.

Food | Food Issue 2017

Calumet Fisheries

A no-frills fishery endures the test of time

Christopher Good

Like some of the best restaurants, Calumet Fisheries is famous for being unassuming. It still sits where it has for the last seven decades, with the 95th Street bridge down the road and the scaffolding of the Chicago Skyway downriver. The surroundings have transformed over the years—the shack currently overlooks twin industrial silos—but the same words are emblazoned under the same red shingle roof, and the same fresh catches lie inside.

Far Southeast Side | Features | Visual Arts

Fugitive Dust

Dirty Energy at the MoCP

Terry Evans

In the middle of an empty room was a Plexiglas cube—and at the bottom of the cube, a fine sheet of black powder. An imaginary moonscape? An abandoned terrarium? Perhaps anticipating these questions, Beate Geissler and Oliver Sann, the Chicago-based artists behind the installation Prevailing Winds and Relative Distances, pasted several pages of text around the room.

Music

So Much Noise To Be Heard

A review of Hieroglyphic Being’s "The Disco’s of Imhotep"

One of the most striking motifs found in The Disco’s of Imhotep, the newest album by Chicago musician Jamal Moss (stage name Hieroglyphic Being), isn’t musical at all: it’s a single word. “Kmt,” a simple anglicization of Egyptian hieroglyphs, is scattered throughout Moss’s discography. Here, it lends its name to “The Sound of KMT,” but earlier this year it served as the title for a collaborative album with his cousin Noleian Reusse in a project called Africans with Mainframes.

Lit

Disappearing Act

José Orduña's "The Weight of Shadows

In The Weight of Shadows, his first book, Orduña recounts a lifetime as the “other”.

Visual Arts

The Past Keeps Happening

Suspending disbelief with filmmaker Christopher Harris

Courtesy of Christopher Harris

But the woman on the screen locks eyes with the audience—whispering that things are “partially true, and therefore totally false”—before her figure is duplicated, flipped upside-down, and inverted like a photographic negative.