Urban planning

Close Encounters with the Furred Kind

The Chicago coyote: neighbor or nuisance?

Javier Suarez

In 2007, customers fled from a Quiznos on Adams St. in the Loop when a coyote snuck in through a propped door and sat down in a refrigerated beverage case. The coyote didn’t bother anyone, but he didn’t buy a sandwich either, so about an hour after his entry, Animal Control came to relocate him to a more appropriate location. Continue reading

Bronzeville | Features | Urban planning

Recreating the Rosenwald

Deciding the future of a Bronzeville landmark in decline

47th and Prairie, looking west. The Rosenwald—visible on the horizon, two blocks west on Michigan—could be an economic boon for 47th Street and Bronzeville as a whole. LUKE WHITE.

47th and Prairie, looking west. The Rosenwald—visible on the horizon, two blocks west on Michigan—could be an economic boon for 47th Street and Bronzeville as a whole. LUKE WHITE.

It’s fine if the grandparents move in with their kids. It’s when little girls and their baby daddies start to move in that there’s going to be trouble.” Church, a local newspaper vendor, was talking about the Michigan Boulevard Garden Apartments, better known as the Rosenwald. Continue reading

Politics | Urban planning

Off the Rails

The demise of a CTA program to employ ex-offenders

“It was all due to one man’s ego,” said Robert Kelly, president of the city’s main rail union. During late November and December of 2013, Kelly was involved in a public spat with the Chicago Transit Authority over the continuation of its rail apprenticeship program. Continue reading

Housing | Lit | Urban planning

From the Ground Up

In "Planning Chicago," make no little plans

Planning Chicago, by D. Bradford Hunt and Jon DeVries

Planning Chicago, by D. Bradford Hunt and Jon DeVries

In Chicago, the word “planning” often evokes the image of Daniel Burnham and his 1909 “Plan of Chicago.” In his famous plan, Burnham proposed superhighways and lakefront parks and, while it was never implemented wholesale, its cohesive vision regarding the downtown and lakefront areas helped put Chicago on track to become a modern city. But “Planning Chicago,” a historical take on Chicago’s urban transformation published last February, argues that the stronger push for Chicago’s modern development came long after Burnham. The Chicago we know, the book claims, was developed not with one big plan but with many small skirmishes and a few big oversights. Continue reading